Past Exhibits

2017

A step back into the 1940’s to 1960’s, remembering the laces that adorned every home.  Tatted, knitted and crocheted doilies, crocheted pot holders, colorful tea towels with lace edgings, fancy printed hankies, interesting aprons, and of course, a ruffled doily under the center piece.  All the ingenious ways to keep critters off your food - pie covers, jelly jar covers, milk bottle toppers, etc.

2017

Whitework display

2016

Christmas: Wrapped up in the holidays.
Point de Gaze lace corner.
"The Lacemakers of Belgium" highlighted the lives and work of these artisans from more than a century ago. The museum's exhibit included a display area recreating a Belgian lace school from early in the 20th century, complete with period photos, costumes, and samples of lace. The exhibit also featured selected items from the museum's own collection of Belgian lace.

2016

2016

Some twentieth century brides selected spectacular gowns for a once-in-a-lifetime moment. Others, like their practical Victorian grandmothers, chose a best dress: a day suit or cocktail dress that could be worn again and again.

The exhibit featured exquisite hand made and machine made lace on the gowns, veils, gloves, shoes, handkerchiefs and other accessories that made up a proper wedding trousseau. A special case featured lace accessories made as gifts for modern brides by members of the Lace Museum Guild.

2015

Christmas - The Night Before Christmas
When most people think of lace, they think of something white, fragile and old.  The Lace Museum’s exhibit, “Thread Around Holes,” dispelled that idea by featuring twenty contemporary lace artists working in a variety of media from wire to ceramic to cyanotype as well as traditional thread.  Pieces were vibrant in color and several incorporated beads.  They ranged in size from a few centimeters to a life size human figure and a life size tree.

2015

2015

“Thread Around Holes” continued: Bobbin lace, needle lace, knitting, crochet, tatting, ceramics and 2-D art were all seen in a new light at this exhibit.  A student’s corner showcased lace made by school-age children in lace museum classes. Many of the guest artists were from the Bay Area, with a few from other parts of California, Texas, Washington and Oregon.

2015

In centuries past, babies wore elaborate gowns for Christenings and other special occasions.  The exhibit at The Lace Museum celebrated this with “Lacy Beginnings” an exhibit of Christening gowns as wonderful examples of hand work including embroidery and lace.

2015

"Lacy Beginnings" continued: The museum’s collection of gowns includes those decorated with Ayrshire white work from the 1840s, eyelet, ruching, bobbin lace, needle lace, pin tucks, stiletto work and other hand-work techniques.  Some gowns in the exhibit were on loan from a collector in Los Altos. The exhibit also included baby bonnets and other baby accessories in many different lace techniques from the 1800s to today.
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